University of Florida
Charles B. Moss

Charles B. Moss

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Vita

1175 MCCA
P.O. Box 110240 IFAS
Gainesville, FL 32611-0240
352-294-7630

Chuck grew up on a cattle and wheat farm in Western Oklahoma. He received his B.S. in Agricultural Economics and Accounting from Oklahoma State University in 1982 and his M.S. in Agricultural Economics in 1984. He continued his studies in Agricultural Economics at Purdue University and received his Ph.D. in 1987. He joined the faculty at the University of Florida's Food and Resource Economics Department in September of 1987 in a newly created research and teaching position in finance and policy analysis. His research has primarily focused on the areas of financial risk and stress in the farm sector. In addition, he has applied his quantitative skills to problems including water resource management, timber resources, citrus crop decisions, coffee marketing in Mexico, trade issues in sugar, analysis of technology adoption including precision agriculture, invasive species and agricultural productivity measures. These research activities have produced 200 research publications including six edited volumes, 23 book chapters, 80 refereed journal articles, nine papers published in proceedings and more than 120 presentations across the country and internationally. Chuck had the privilege to serve as a McKethan-Matherly fellow in the Economics Department at the University of Florida from 1989-1994 working with the late Professor Henri Theil and is an affiliate member of the Center for Applied Optimization and the Center for Latin American Studies, both at the University of Florida. In 2006, Chuck received the Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics Outstanding Journal Article award with Steve Blank and Kenneth Erickson. In addition, he received the American Agricultural Economics Association Quality of Research Discovery Award in 2007 for research in collaboration with Grigorios Livanis, Vincent Breneman, and Richard Nehring. Chuck has served as Co-Editor of the Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics and on the editorial boards of the Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics and the Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics.

Chuck enjoys teaching and has had the opportunity to develop several courses, including graduate level courses in Agricultural Finance, Agricultural Risk Analysis and Decision Making, Static and Dynamic Optimization, Optimal Control, Mathematical Programming, Production Economics, Statistics for Food and Resource Economics, and Econometric Methods II. He has served on 20 graduate student committees, including students from Universidad Autonoma de Chapingo and Vanderbilt University in addition the University of Florida.

Chuck has also been successful in funding research interests through competitive grants including three USDA/National Research Initiative grants to study competitiveness in Agricultural Credit Markets, Crop Patterns and Water Use under Free Trade, and the effect of Vertical Integration on U.S. Sugar Policy. In addition, to the NRI grants, he has secured funding from the USDA/ERS to work on measurement of the agricultural land input in the USDA's production accounts. On a more local level, he has worked with both the Northwest Florida Water Management District and the Saint Johns River Water Management District to estimate agricultural and household water demand in those regions.

Education

  • Doctor of Philosophy, December 1987, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. General Area of Study; Agricultural Finance, Agricultural Policy, Macroeconomics, Quantitative Methods. Thesis: "The Effect of Macroeconomic Factors on the Well-Being of a Representative Midwestern Crop and Livestock Farm." Major Advisor, Dr. Tim Baker.
  • Master of Science, August 1984, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma. General Area of Study; Agricultural Finance, Agricultural Policy, Quantitative Methods.
  • Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, December 1982, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma. Agricultural Economics-Accounting (double major).

Professional Experience

  • University of Florida, Department of Food and Resource Economics. Professor, August 1998 to present. Appointment: research and teaching in the area of agricultural finance and econometrics.
  • University of Florida, Department of Food and Resource Economics. Graduate Coordinator, June 2010 to present.
  • University of Florida, Center for Latin American Studies, Affiliate Member, February 2006 to Present.
  • University of Florida, Center for Applied Optimization, Affiliate Member, August 2000 to Present.
  • University of Florida, Department of Food and Resource Economics. Associate Professor with tenure, August 1993 to August 1998. Appointment: research and teaching in the area of agricultural finance and econometrics.
  • University of Florida, Department of Economics. McKethan-Matherly fellow, 1989 to 1994.
  • University of Florida, Department of Food and Resource Economics. Assistant Professor, September 1987 to August 1993. Appointment: research and teaching in the area of agricultural finance.
  • Purdue University, Department of Agricultural Economics. Graduate Staff, August 1984 to September 1987. Responsibilities included teaching and research in the area of agricultural finance.
  • Oklahoma State University, Department of Agricultural Economics. Graduate Assistant, January 1983 to August 1984. Responsibilities included research in farm financial management and policy and one semester as teaching assistant for senior level course in agricultural policy.
  • Oklahoma State University, Department of Agricultural Economics. Undergraduate Teaching Assistant, August 1982 to December 1982; Farm and Ranch Management I (AGEC 3413).
  • Oklahoma State University, Department of Agricultural Economics. Undergraduate Research Assistant, October 1981 to May 1982; the research involved studying the recreational value of the Arkansas Navigation Project; responsibilities included data analysis and computer programming.

Awards and Honors

  • American Agricultural Economics Association Quality of Research Discovery Award, 2007 (with Grigorios Livanis, Vincent Breneman, and Richard Nehring)
  • Outstanding Journal Article 2006 Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics (with Steven C. Blank and Kenneth W. Erickson)
  • Outstanding Research Program 2003-2004, Food and Resource Economics Department
  • Preferred Assistantship Purdue University, 1984

Courses Taught

  • AEB 4141 – Agribusiness Financial Management
    This course requires the student to solve financial and other management problems faced by agricultural firms and agribusinesses. The course is intended as a capstone for which students are required to integrate material from their entire program into the financial decision-making process.
  • AEB 4511 – Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource Economics
    The purpose of this course is to further develop the student’s mathematical skills emphasizing those techniques utilized in economics.
  • AEB 6145 – Agricultural Finance
    Principles of firm financial management, financial markets, financial institutions, capital markets, firm growth, and analysis. The course emphasizes financial markets and application of financial principles. Taught with P.J. van Blokland.
  • AEB 6182 – Agricultural Risk Analysis and Decision Making
    This course is a review of the conceptual framework and research methods for the analysis of decision making under risk by agricultural producers. The course covers expected utility theory, risk programming, stochastic dominance, and dynamic decision models.
  • AEB 6184 – Production Economics
    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the standard theoretical and empirical models used in the investigation of firm level production decisions.
  • AEB 6533 – Static and Dynamic Optimization
    This course, which focuses on optimization theory and methods, is one of the core requirements in the department’s Ph.D. program. The applied basis of numerical optimization, including the development of classical optimization theory, is reviewed during the first half of the course, and the dynamic principal of optimality is covered in the second half.
  • AEB 6571 – Econometric Methods I
    This course develops statistical foundations that will be used in microeconomic theory, econometrics, production economics, and financial economics. The development focuses primarily on the mathematical formulation of statistics.
  • AEB 6592 – Mathematical Programming in Agricultural Economics
    This course is intended to introduce the student to optimization techniques and modeling in agricultural economics. Completion of the course should enable the student to solve numerical optimization problems with and without computer support. Further, the student will be introduced to how these optimization models have been used in agricultural economics.
  • AEB 6933 – Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource Economics
    This course is a review of mathematical techniques that are typically applied in economics, such as multivariate calculus, linear algebra, differential equations, and real analysis.
  • AEB 6933 – Dynamic Agricultural Economics
    This course provided the students an overview of dynamic techniques in agricultural economics including simulation, optimal control, and dynamic programming. I collaborated on this course with William Boggess and Thomas Spreen. My portion of the course involved Optimal Control.
  • AEB 6933 – Applied Econometrics Seminar
    This course, related to current departmental work on advanced econometrics with Henri Theil, was a special topics course offered to students. The seminar focused on the use of informational estimators, parameterization problems arising from the application of maximum likelihood assuming normality in small samples, and income inequality
  • FIN 6446 - Financial Theory I
    This is the first course in the Ph.D. financial theory section offered in the Business School. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with basic principles of finance theory emphasizing the theory of the firm’s investment and financing decisions. To accomplish this goal, this course will focus on basic concepts of decision making under risk, market efficiency, asset pricing, capital structure and dividend policy.